Ryan E. Walters, Cinematographer

Cinematic Excellence at 24 Frames a Second

Three Secret Lighting Tips For Next Your Action Film


Shooting an action film is a daunting task under the best of circumstances, let alone when you have a small lighting crew of three, and a tight schedule. In this post, I'm going to share with you how we pulled off a two day shoot in one day, and give you the three lighting secrets you need to know to make your next action film look amazing.
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Two Crucial Tips To Drive Your Stock Footage Sales (Stock Video Part 04)


Alright, it is time to dive back in to my eight-part guide to getting your start in stock video. If you missed the first 3 parts, I highly recommend that you go back and give them a read. In Part 01 I cover common misconceptions. Part 02 tackles whether or not you should be exclusive. And Part 03 addresses who you should be selling to.

Here, in Part 04 of the guide, I'll share with you the two most crucial tips you should follow if you want to drive sales of your stock footage.
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How To Light A Film With Only 300w Of Light


The short film I shot recently, Two Wolves, exemplifies the principle of embracing your practical constraints and finding creative solutions within them. In this post, I'm going to take you behind the scenes of the film and show you the lighting setups (and diagrams) I used for the two primary scenes of the film. And the great thing about it is that we only used 300w for the entire film!
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The Curse Of The Perfectionist: Why My Work Is Never Good Enough

Still From The Short: Two Wolves

Ever since childhood, when I began drawing and painting, I've been seeking to take the images in my head and make them a reality. At the end of every attempt, I would look at what I had created... and all that stood out to me were the flaws- what I could have done better. It was never good enough for my standards. This same drive (or curse... ) for perfection continues to follow me to this day. No matter what the size, scale, or budget level of the project, when I look at what I've created, all I can see is where I need to improve.

This is not to say that I'm not happy with my work. I am. But I know I still have a lot of room to grow in my craft. It is because of that push for growth that I am always critically evaluating my own work. So I thought it would be a good exercise to share with you what I see as my mistakes in a recent short film that I shot.
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The Secret To Delivering Great Images Within Tight Deadlines

Test Frame: Experimenting With Gels

Earlier this week I received news from my writer & director friend AJ Brooks that the short I DP'd for him won first place in last months DVXuser fest. To add a little perspective, this film was shot over two nights with a volunteer crew of five (AJ & myself count as 2 of that 5), and then edited and delivered it four days later. The news of this win reminds me yet again that the secret to great images with tight deadlines is not in using fancy gear and large crews, but it is in spending the time in preproduction developing a solid plan and testing it out beforehand.

Here are the two steps I took to set us up for success.
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